For Boys and Girls Ages 6 and Under

U6 Micro Soccer is a coed program for boys and girls ages six and under, with smaller fields, shorter games, and only six players (three per side) on the field at a time. The program is strictly developmental, with an emphasis on learning and fun rather than on winning or scores. Smaller teams and fewer players on the field allow each player to be more engaged in the game, and provides a better learning environment for all participants

  • Cost: U6 fees are $205 for the 2015-2016 program year.  Costs for other EBU programs are listed on our Program Fees page
  • Register for U6 Micro Soccer

About U6 Micro Soccer

During the season, teams meet once a week for one hour. The first half hour is reserved for team practice, and the second half hour is devoted to game play, with game monitors taking the place of referees to supervise play and help children learn.

  • U6 Micro Soccer Guides
  • U6 Micro Soccer FAQ

Age Requirement

EBU Micro Soccer teams are for boys and girls who are entering kindergarten in the fall and will turn 5 years old no later than September 1st. Children in preschool, pre-K, or who turn 5 years old after September 1st, are NOT eligible for Micro Soccer.

Team Size

Each team roster contains 9 – 10 players. A maximum number of players is set at 10. This ensures more playing time and further development for each participant.

Micro Soccer Format

EBU Micro Soccer occurs once a week for one hour. The first half hour is reserved for team practice and the second half hour is allotted to game play. Game play consists of two, ten minute games, with a five minute half time break in between. The last five minutes serve as a final wrap-up session and as snack time.

For the game portion of Micro Soccer, each EBU U6 Micro Soccer team divides its players into squads and plays games simultaneously on adjoining fields.

On each field there are six players, three from each team. This game format is more simply referred to as 3 v 3.

If there are more than three players from each team in each squad, substitutions must be made. Substitutions may occur at any time, and should be frequent to allow players equal playing time. The coach and assistant coach supervise each game. The coach monitors one game and the assistant coach oversees the other game on the adjoining field. There are no formal referees in Micro Soccer. Instead, a Game Monitor oversees each game. The Game Monitor is a volunteer, usually a parent, who serves as a supervisor, and also is responsible for restarting the ball if it goes out of play. Every game must have a Game Monitor; therefore, the team must produce two volunteer Game Monitors each week. Teams should be fairly even in Micro Soccer. Although standings and the score are never formally tallied during the season, the players are aware if they are winning or losing games by a substantial amount. Therefore, in order to keep Micro Soccer an enjoyable experience for all participants, teams should be pretty equally matched. Mismatches do occur however, and when they do, actions should be taken to balance the mismatch. Coaches may make substitutions or even change around the team before the next game in an attempt to create a more even match.